Successful Entrepreneurs Who Quit Their Job To Pursue Their Passion

I was one of 25 successful entrepreneurs who quit their jobs to pursue their passion: See Daniel C. Lavery's Response  to InvoiceBerry Blog:

(Please click on this Blog below: "25 Successful Entrepreneurs Who Quit Their Job to Pursue Their Passions" to see the post I created in answer to their Query):

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(Click above here)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Dan, Joan, with our son, Aleksey,  on the great Gallo March for Cesar Chavez's United Farm Workers near Delano, California, 1975 

Whose history are we really talking about?

 

 

That question requires us to focus on where we came from, our history, and everyone else's. We have all learned some form of history from different teachers in school, from books, and from the media. The history many of us grew up with involved powerful kings, queens, wars, governments, and the development of parliamentary democracy with some historical and romantic novels. But for the British, for example, when England leaves the Catholic Church in 1534 major changes occurred after Henry the VIII that changed how we approach the subject.

 
 

By the time some of us entered a university our perspective began really changing. Marxism had arrived bringing a heightened attention to the arc of class and economics. The Russians with the horrendous record of brutal killing under Stalin suddenly became our ally against the vicious Nazi regime Hitler led in a world that featured three fascist countries against what we called loosely “the free world”. Many treatises on history have helped to revolutionize our view of the past, but surely began filling up with depth from new historical knowledge that modified what simplistic patriotism taught our children about such issues as slavery, racism, and war and how we were exceptional.

 
 

After WWII things drastically changed and our military industrial complex with the aid of the CIA launched a series of military actions that were far from helping build up weaker countries. Supporting unpopular dictators because third world countries might lean towards communism, like in Vietnam brought us into a war of choice built on a lie that two of our Navy Destroyers were attacked on the high seas by North Vietnamese torpedo boats when the Senate Foreign Relations Committee unraveled the truth. We had provoked the attack the night before by sending Norwegian fast boats with Vietnamese crews attacking North Vietnamese torpedo boats while U.S. Navy ships bombarded them from the ocean!

 
 

(Fulbright Senate Foreign Relations Committee Hearings on Vietnam )

 

Soon we were involved in a widespread peace movement, nearly one half million deserters, draft dodgers, and our President Nixon carried on a secret B-52 bombing campaign into neutral Cambodia followed by an invasion he called a “protective reaction!” A few days later the nation responded with a series of loud protests around the country from thousands of colleges and with anti-war veterans’ groups expressing their outrage at Nixon’s expanding an unpopular war. When five students were killed and nine injured by national guards at Kent State, the numbers of protestors dramatically increased as did the rhetoric of the Nixon Administration attacking the protestors as slime. Christian Appy’s American Reckoning is one of only a few histories of the Vietnam War that describes how it ended America’s exceptionalism-the broad faith that the U.S. is a unique force for good in the world-for most people and had a profound effect on our national identity.

 
 

Another force connected with women involved half the population followed by equally powerful questions about race and racism. The idea of history as a procession of dead white males written by live ones may sound ridiculous now, but the war to open up a wider perspective was a real one. So writers of history began demonstrating different point of emphasis and views. Soon the teaching of science and engineering became increasingly important.

 
 

All exposes the current assault on the humanities within higher education as even more uncultured. The thinking goes like this: the study of history, English, philosophy or art doesn't help anyone get a job and does not contribute to the economy to the same degree that science or engineering or business studies do. I believe most of us say that is nonsense and obfuscation.

 

(My Lai Massacre killed 500 Vietnamese lives of unarmed men, women, children and babies)

 

The humanities, including history, teach people how to think analytically while at the same time appreciating innovation and creativity. Isn't that a good set of skills for most jobs? Yet we have a Black population clearly left behind even after a vigorous civil rights movement under Martin Luther King Jr, and those who followed his lead with a variety of militant and peaceful organizations that led to civil rights amendments to the Constitution and civil rights laws involving anti-discrimination in schools, employment and police interactions.

 
 

One could wish that the historians were all more accurate. Why would some dare doubt climate change when the science has established it’s truth as one of our most serious problems? Toni Morrison brought to life the inner life of slavery, and pushed the modern reader to confront this reality. Another confronted the same difficult history from a white woman's perspective. One memoir produces anti-war feelings from the righteous revulsion against gross misuse of power. Another accuses those who cringe at the horrors of Hiroshima as "hand wringers". Any society that fails to pay proper attention to whose history we are exploring, and from what perspective, maybe starving his/her own imagination and missing an opportunity to participate spreading useful historical knowledge so mistakes of the past may be understood and avoided in the future. 

 
 

(Hiroshima the day after we dropped an atomic weapon on that city followed by another later on Nagasaki despite many generals who conceded they were completely unnecessary since we had decimated their cities with Napalm, owned the skies for bombing anywhere, and Hirohito was ready and willing to surrender.)

Lust Supposedly is a Dark Sin

 

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 Lust supposedly is a dark sin for those who have sold out to religion's grip on our mind. D.H. Lawrence surely lusted after many a delightful romantic moment and led us away from the guilt we are taught at Sunday school at least at the Baptist Church for example. I saw Billy Graham preach against lust when fifteen in Japan as did the captain of my football team, a Texan, who would become Oliver North's commanding officer in Nicaragua and took me through the book of John one long sleepover night at his home Bible training me against that horrible and lustful sin that was sure to prevent my entrance to heaven.

         

  Fortunately, I discovered Lawrence in literature along with Joyce, Hemingway, and many others who had a healthy sexual urge that was not like the Trumpster demanding his handful of pussy because he was rich and powerful, but because they adored the physical, the marvelous body and mind of their adorable love interests they took to the woods with a bottle of wine, and were madly in love as they laid in the grass with her, on a blanket.  
  They shared their lustful loving ephemeral moments that shined in novels that carried them away from the boring occasional monotony of existence and took the reader to places only their imagination could exult in. The intensity of a life they adored when they found that special moment with a loved one, and explored all of it with gusto as we all should have when a spontaneous opportunity arrives.  
 

Otherwise we would regret having lost that moment in time when we blended with another in mutual ecstasy and understood the body electric with no thought of dominance or abuse but sharing a moment of bliss with our loved one.

   

 “When we get out of the glass bottles of our ego,

and when we escape like squirrels turning in the

cages of our personality

and get into the forests again,

we shall shiver with cold and fright

but things will happen to us

so that we don't know ourselves.

Cool, unlying life will rush in,

and passion will make our bodies taut with power,

we shall stamp our feet with new power

and old things will fall down,

we shall laugh, and institutions will curl up like

burnt paper.” 

― D.H. Lawrence

   

Daniel C. Lavery

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http://www.danielclavery.com (author website) All the Difference, a memoir by Daniel C. Lavery, “From a Pawn in the Military to a Crusader for Justice” available at Amazon.com. for purchase or free look inside of the first 6 1/2 chapters, Amazon's Kindle at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BNXHV9Q, A paperback version is available at http://www.amazon.com/All-Difference-Daniel-C-Lavery/dp/1482676532/