Lust Supposedly is a Dark Sin

 

 d-h-lawrence-photo

 

 

 

 Lust supposedly is a dark sin for those who have sold out to religion's grip on our mind. D.H. Lawrence surely lusted after many a delightful romantic moment and led us away from the guilt we are taught at Sunday school at least at the Baptist Church for example. I saw Billy Graham preach against lust when fifteen in Japan as did the captain of my football team, a Texan, who would become Oliver North's commanding officer in Nicaragua and took me through the book of John one long sleepover night at his home Bible training me against that horrible and lustful sin that was sure to prevent my entrance to heaven.

         

  Fortunately, I discovered Lawrence in literature along with Joyce, Hemingway, and many others who had a healthy sexual urge that was not like the Trumpster demanding his handful of pussy because he was rich and powerful, but because they adored the physical, the marvelous body and mind of their adorable love interests they took to the woods with a bottle of wine, and were madly in love as they laid in the grass with her, on a blanket.  
  They shared their lustful loving ephemeral moments that shined in novels that carried them away from the boring occasional monotony of existence and took the reader to places only their imagination could exult in. The intensity of a life they adored when they found that special moment with a loved one, and explored all of it with gusto as we all should have when a spontaneous opportunity arrives.  
 

Otherwise we would regret having lost that moment in time when we blended with another in mutual ecstasy and understood the body electric with no thought of dominance or abuse but sharing a moment of bliss with our loved one.

   

 “When we get out of the glass bottles of our ego,

and when we escape like squirrels turning in the

cages of our personality

and get into the forests again,

we shall shiver with cold and fright

but things will happen to us

so that we don't know ourselves.

Cool, unlying life will rush in,

and passion will make our bodies taut with power,

we shall stamp our feet with new power

and old things will fall down,

we shall laugh, and institutions will curl up like

burnt paper.” 

― D.H. Lawrence

   

Daniel C. Lavery

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http://www.danielclavery.com (author website) All the Difference, a memoir by Daniel C. Lavery, “From a Pawn in the Military to a Crusader for Justice” available at Amazon.com. for purchase or free look inside of the first 6 1/2 chapters, Amazon's Kindle at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BNXHV9Q, A paperback version is available at http://www.amazon.com/All-Difference-Daniel-C-Lavery/dp/1482676532/

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About Daniel C. Lavery

Dan’s writing shows his transformation from a child to an athlete and a Duke pre-ministerial student where he began to question ancient and arbitrary dogma. He graduated from Annapolis, navigated a Navy jet, and a ship to Vietnam, fell in love, turned peace activist and a civil rights lawyer for Cesar Chavez's UFW. His memoir, "All the Difference," describes the experiences, some humorous and others deadly, that changed his consciousness from a pawn to an advocate crusading for justice against some of the most powerful forces in America.

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